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How far have we come?

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Harry J. Elston







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Stands to reason

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): John DeLaHunt







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Electric vehicle charging and ANSI/SHRMWV1.1-2011 Workplace Violence Prevention and INtervention

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): David Rainer







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Do you believe in Murphy's Law?

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Dennis C. Hendershot







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Performance of turbulence models for dense gas release in computational fluid dynamics

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Ali Tarjoman Nejad , Mahnaz Yasemi

The prediction of temporal and spatial concentration profiles of gas cloud is of great importance in safety issues. Existing models for predicting dense gases release are used for flat plates, and they cannot usually involve the complex environments, hence in this article, computational fluid dynamics have been used for prediction of dense gases behavior. The selection of turbulence model shows its significance in the results of computational fluid dynamics. In order to select the best turbulence model, the models of k–ɛ and k–ω have been studied. Experimental data of the test no. 26 of Thorney Island Series data have been extracted. The results show that k–ɛ realizable model is closest to the experimental data. This model has the closest and most appropriate prediction of the spatial and temporal profile. The model is also able to predict the phenomenon of gravity slumping associated with dense gas dispersion.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

A comprehensive plan to reduce losses from water damage at a university

Publication date: Available online 23 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Neil G. Carlson , Kelly Mullane

Water damage to buildings at research institutions is disruptive and costly. Research Universities have a unique variety of building stock varying from high hazard research laboratories to traditional offices, dorms, multifamily student housing, libraries, residences and rental properties. Each of these represents different challenges. Institutions can benefit from an integrated response to water events that includes prevention and mitigation strategies to reduce the cost and improve the durability of buildings.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Evaluation of the use of an SKC button inhalable aerosol sampler with a grimm aerosol monitor to determine air concentrations of subtilisin

Publication date: Available online 10 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Jason Cross , Rodney R. Larson , Leon F. Pahler , Darrah K. Sleeth

Study purpose Currently, there is no OSHA or NIOSH monitoring method for subtilisin. This study evaluated a personal aerosol monitoring method for detection and quantification of subtilisin. The ACGIH ceiling limit and NIOSH short term exposure limit (STEL) for subtilisin is 0.06μg/m3 making it the lowest exposure limit established for any exposure by the organizations. This study specifically evaluated the use of an SKC Button inhalable aerosol sampler with a Grimm Aerosol Monitor for monitoring low concentrations of subtilisin particulates in air within a laundry detergent production facility. Methods Air samples of detergent with subtilisin were collected using a Button sampler containing a glass fiber filter concurrently with a Grimm model 1.109 Aerosol Spectrometer. Nineteen sampling events of four hours each were performed over a 7-week period, with three Button samplers operating simultaneously. Sampling locations included a detergent containing subtilisin (DCS) production area and a specially constructed enclosure where DCS was introduced in a controlledmanner. Sample analysis was conducted with a Konelab Arena 20 analyzer to quantify the amount of subtilisin collected on the filter of each air sample. Results A linear regression for the concentration of DCS aerosol measured in the enclosure by the Grimm was compared to the average concentration of DCS aerosol measured on the Button filter in the enclosure, which produced an R 2 value of 0.64 (p =0.006). The Pearson's correlation produced an r value of 0.8 (p =0.006). The linear regression for the average concentrations of DCS aerosol measured on the Button filter media compared to the average subtilisin detected from the aerosol in the enclosure produced an R 2 value of 0.66 (p =0.004). The Pearson's correlation produced an r value of 0.81 (p =0.004). Discussion The amount of subtilisin in all air samples in the DCS production area were below the limit of quantitation due to the subtilisin encapsulation at the DCS production area. This caused particles sizes to be greater than the inhalable fraction (100μm), which is also the limit of the size selectivity of the Button inhalable sampler. Conclusion The results of the statistical evaluation from the aerosol monitoring results in the enclosure indicate the Button inhalable sampler compared with the results from the Grimm aerosol monitor may be a valid method for determining airborne subtilisin concentrations for aerosols with diameters less than or equal to the 25μm particle size. However, due to all results below the limit of quantitation at the DCS production area, it is concluded that there are insufficient results to determine if the Button sampler with the Grimm aerosol monitor can be used in the workplace.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Contents

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4









Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Editorial Board

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4









Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

What the TSA can teach us about chemical safety

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): Harry J. Elston







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Case study: Lead monitoring prevents huge compensation claim

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): Neal Langerman

A young woman was diagnosed with ovarian cancer and her treating physician raised the possibility that over-exposure to lead (dust and/or fume) at work could be causative. This case study documents how five years of industrial hygiene activity which guided an aggressive lead management program provided the data which convinced both the employee and her physician that this was not a workplace incurred illness.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Adding amines to steam for humidification

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): Farhad Memarzadeh

Humidity control is required in all health care facilities. Direct injection of steam from a central boiler plant is the most economical humidification system. The steam carries neutralizing amines—corrosion-inhibiting chemicals—that are added to boiler feedwater to prevent pipe corrosion. When the steam condenses, the amines neutralize the resulting carbonic acid and raise the pH of the condensate, which helps reduce, slow down, or prevent corrosion to the condensate system. This technical review compares the use of ‘clean steam’ to ‘utility’ steam and discusses the health effects, regulation, and control of three of the most commonly used amines in ‘utility’ steam: morpholine, cyclohexylamine (CHA), and diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) to make the point that proper application, control, monitoring and oversight of amines in a ‘utility’ steam system of a health care facility is safe, feasible and economical.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

A research university's rapid response to a fatal chemistry accident: Safety changes and outcomes

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): James H. Gibson , Imke Schröder , Nancy L. Wayne

The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) quickly and comprehensively transformed its laboratory safety program following a chemistry accident in December 2008 that caused the death of a researcher. UCLA's Chancellor immediately announced sweeping changes in the laboratory safety program and challenged UCLA to become “Best in Class” in academic laboratory safety. Given the size of UCLA's lab researcher population and the decentralized nature of the campus, it became a daunting task to reach out and improve compliance with newly implemented safety policies. The Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) improved their operations, enhanced overall inspection procedures, and instituted mandatory laboratory safety training of PIs and researchers. A Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool (LHAT) was implemented to aid in the identification of hazards, track laboratory space and personnel, and guide lab groups in compliance with personal protective equipment (PPE) policies. Laboratory inspections were increased by more than 4-fold in 2012 as compared to 2007 and now followed a comprehensive checklist to improve reproducibility and thoroughness of the inspection process. To provide better customer service to the research community and expedite corrective actions, all laboratory inspection reports are required to be issued the next business day. Unannounced PPE inspections began in 2010, and inspection findings showed a robust decrease in non-compliance with the PPE policy within one year of its implementation. As of the first half of 2013, all PIs of active laboratory research programs had completed the initial, in-class PI-specific laboratory safety training. In 2012, more than 20,000 EH&S safety classes were completed either in-class or online by PIs, lab supervisors, research staff, students, and visitors to UCLA's research laboratories. Overall, analysis of outcomes from changes in UCLA's lab safety program indicates rapid improvements in compliance with lab safety regulations such as increased PPE use. Lab safety changes required commitment and cooperation at all levels – from executive leadership, to health and safety experts, to deans and department chairs, and to PIs and researchers.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Quantitative risk-based ranking of chemicals considering hazardous thermal reactions

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): Saheed Busura , Faisal Khan , Kelly Hawboldt , AbdulJelil Iliyas

In this study, a simplified kinetic model was developed for sulphide mineral ores for assessing thermal hazards and tested with Differential Scanning Calorimeter experiments using AKTS software. In addition, a methodology was developed for assessing the severity of thermal hazards associated based on the core parameters and measured responses such as the constituents and reactive interaction effects i.e. mineralogy, particle size distribution, and moisture content. The likelihood of thermal hazards was quantified using the core parameters of the global thermal reactions via probabilistic analysis while the severity of the hazards was evaluated on the strength of accompanied enthalpy of reactions. The associated risks were then determined as product of these probability and severity. Finally, a risk ranking method was proposed on a predefined scale which was used to rank and interpret the obtained results. The quantitative risk assessment of thermal hazards for self-heating sulphide containing mineral was thus assessed. It was observed that the ores were of medium risk of runaway reaction.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Nicotine

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): William E. Luttrell , Howard F. Vogel







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Reducing investigators’ administrative work load

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): David Rainer







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Backwards

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): John DeLaHunt







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Are your alarms alarming?

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): Dennis C. Hendershot







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Incident investigations

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): Peter C. Ashbrook







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Unintended consequences

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): Neal Langerman







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS
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