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Development of a policy to improve oversight of extremely hazardous chemicals

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Ben Owens

At the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) the use of radioactive materials and biological agents in laboratory research requires approval by the institutional radiation safety committee and biosafety committee, respectively. Investigators who want to use hazardous chemicals, however, do not have to obtain approval. This disparity in institutional oversight of different classes of hazardous materials is a result of more stringent regulatory and research funding requirements rather than the hazards posed by the materials themselves. Recognizing the potential for severe incidents involving highly reactive chemicals and other extremely hazardous chemicals, development of a policy for review of these chemicals was initiated. Development of this policy involved establishing the scope and inclusion criteria, consideration of the effect on laboratory research productivity, diplomacy, and compromise. Development of this policy in its current draft format is described.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

From beaker to bucket: The safe scale-up of organic electrolyte materials

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Trevor Dzwiniel , Krzysztof Pupek , Gregory Krumdick

Argonne's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program provide a critical junction that bridges the gap between the initial discovery and commercialization of new materials. The goal of the facility is to develop safe, scalable, and economic processes to produce kilogram quantities of material needed for industrial evaluation. This presentation will describe the main administrative and engineering measures undertaken during scale-up to assure safe transition from discovery to kilo scale syntheses of organic electrolyte materials for advanced lithium batteries.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Those pesky peroxides…

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Dawn Mason

Sensitive to different degrees of shock, heat and friction, peroxides may cause unexpected explosions and thus, are arguably one of the most hazardous classes of chemicals that are routinely handled in the laboratory. In addition, species that are known to form peroxides are often routinely handled in a number of industries by workers with varying levels of experience who may, or may not, fully understand the implications of working with such substances. This manuscript discusses examples of the risks involved in working with peroxide formers, conditions that can cause the formation of peroxides, and proper handling of peroxide formers.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

The cardinal rule of explosives safety

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): J. Keith Butler

The US Military and its contractors work safely with energetic materials on both an industrial scale and a laboratory scale. Practices and procedures used with these materials will benefit academic and research laboratories that work with reactive, energetic, and explosive materials. The most effective practice may be one of the simplest and least expensive to implement. This is especially useful for laboratories beginning new projects with inexperienced laboratory workers. Though not a substitute for a detailed chemical hazard analysis with strictly enforced standard laboratory procedures, the cardinal rule of explosives safety must be adhered to at all times: “Expose the minimum number of people to the minimum amount of explosive for the minimum amount of time” This information was originally presented at the 246th ACS National Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana September 9, 2013 for the ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety symposium “Managing reactive chemistry”.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Reactivity control using a Schlenk line

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Tilak Chandra , Jeffrey P. Zebrowski

Schlenk line (SL) techniques are very common for manipulating air and/or moisture sensitive compounds in organic, inorganic and bioorganic chemistry. Physical and chemical hazards such as pressure burst, explosions, and implosions are usually associated with the SL manipulations due to the use of inert gas, vacuum, liquid nitrogen and chemicals. Therefore researchers require skills in using the Schlenk line for chemical manipulations. This manuscript describes about the SL set-up, its use for controlling reactivity of hydrogenation and moisture sensitive chemicals, and the hazards associated with manipulations.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Acetone

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): William E. Luttrell , Austin L. LaGrow







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Things to think about when POTUS comes to campus

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): David Rainer







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Watersport

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): John DeLaHunt







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Learning from experience revisited

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Dennis C. Hendershot







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Fire hazards

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Peter C. Ashbrook







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

FIRST®

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Neal Langerman







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Protective equipment for small-scale laboratory explosive hazards. Part 1. Clothing for hand and body protection

Publication date: Available online 6 September 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Chris Murray , Peter Jenkins , Stephen Miller

A range of commercially available protective gloves, wrist protectors and apron or jacket materials were tested against detonating explosive charge masses of up to 7.5g with a short stand-off. The explosive charges were placed in representative fragment sources such as glass round bottom flasks or porcelain Buchner funnels. The firings were evaluated using test article recovery and high speed video footage. Near-complete protection was possible at the 0.3g scale, whilst a very significant reduction in expected injury was possible at the 1.0g scale.
Graphical abstract




Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Determination of formaldehyde in air in selected hospital-histopathology laboratories in Cagayan de Oro, Philippines

Publication date: Available online 7 August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Jenny G. Jerusalem , Van Ryan Kristopher R. Galarpe

The study focused on the occupational exposure of gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) in selected hospital-histopathology laboratories in Cagayan de Oro. This was carried to estimate the potential levels of HCHO during gross-cutting period using absorbent medium between two time intervals. Modified passive sample set-ups of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and DNPH-coated silica were used for air sample collection between 1h and 3h intervals and were analyzed spectrometrically. Infrared (IR) analysis for DNPH-coated silica sample showed relevant peaks of the known IR spectra of formaldehyde hydrazone: 1,600–1,636cm−1 (CN); 1,000–1,350cm−1 (CN); 2,945–2,900cm−1 (aliphatic stretch); 3,218–3,080cm−1 (NHN); and 880–900cm−1 (meta disubstituted aromatic). Generally, gaseous HCHO concentrations in three histopathology laboratories during its gross-cutting period exceeded the recommended exposure ceiling limits of American Conference of Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) and United States Department of Labor-Occupational Safety and Health Administration (USDOL-OSHA) (0.3–0.75ppm). Absorbing efficiency of DNPH set-up was statistically different from that of DNPH-coated silica set-up. Increased concentration was observed for the 3h interval using DNPH-coated (0.93±0.32ppm (Hospital A), 0.80±0.59ppm (Hospital B), and 1.03±0.36ppm (Hospital C)). Thus, the installation of exhausts ventilation system was seen necessary to minimize occupational exposure.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Publication date: <pubDate>Available

Publication date: Available online 4 August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Neal Langerman







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Standard Operating Procedures

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Peter C. Ashbrook







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Bisphenol A

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): William E. Luttrell , Bryce A. Baird







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Upcoming events

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety









Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Pioneers in Chemical Safety Howard H. Fawcett

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Robert Alaimo







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

How far have we come?

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Harry J. Elston







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Electric vehicle charging and ANSI/SHRMWV1.1-2011 Workplace Violence Prevention and INtervention

Publication date: Available online 31 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): David Rainer







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS
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