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Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4

Author(s): Ken Fivizzani







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Guide for Authors

Publication date: July–August 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 4









Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Case study: The value of “less than” and “non-detects” in monitoring

Publication date: Available online 24 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Harry J. Elston

Personal sampling is conducted in workplaces to establish and document the level of worker's exposure to hazardous chemicals. The results obtained from the monitoring are compared to recognized occupational exposure limits to judge if those limits have been exceeded. When the results come back from the lab as indistinguishable from a known blank or less than an occupational exposure limit some employers stop there. However, these results can often reveal important information about work practices that can be improved to reduce worker's exposure. In this case study, we look at organic vapor exposure during a “qualitative analysis” experiment at a small college and look at the results as a springboard to improve work practices and to teach workplace exposure reduction techniques.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Presenting of failure probability assessment pattern by FTA in Fuzzy logic (case study: Distillation tower unit of oil refinery process)

Publication date: Available online 23 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): M. Omidvari , S.M.R. Lavasani , S. Mirza

Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) is an appropriate tool for failure analysis and failure rate determination. In some cases, it is difficult or even impossible to determine the relationships among the main factors of system failure. Moreover manual calculation of subsystem failure probability rate is hard or impossible. Also, in some situation for the lack of information about the process and main event obtained results are uncertain. This is where fuzzy tool can be best exploited. In this study with matching of FTA and fuzzy for determination of failure probability, we can obtain accurate and certain results. Refinery industry is one of the most dangerous industries in Iran and in some places it is located near the crowded cities. The distillation unit, as one of the most dangerous units in this industry, was evaluated by Fuzzy Fault tree analysis (FFTA) tool. The findings of this study can be used in risk management method.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Incorporating safety into the general chemistry curriculum

Publication date: Available online 16 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Frankie Wood-Black

Providing safety instruction is relatively easy, but having safety become second nature to the student is very difficult. Over time laboratory safety has improved particularly in the general laboratory curriculum. However, having key elements and concepts of safety carry over into other aspects of the student's environment and building a safety culture is still in development. One approach designed to augment current safety programs has been applied to the general laboratory curriculum. This approach incorporates a safety information “scavenger hunt” and introduction of a generalized hazard analysis. Use of these tools has shown that elements of a safety culture can be instilled with a minimum of disruption in the current program.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Fire modeling of an emerging fire suppression system

Publication date: Available online 9 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Michael E. Cournoyer

Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Test methodology has been developed (experiments and computations) to predict fire induced tube wall failure in small scale compartments such as gloveboxes. A small scale test apparatus has been developed to characterize tube wall temperature and breakage properties. Computational tools have been used to better understand experiments. The heat release rate and heat flux have been accurately predicted because the forward predicted temperatures closely matched the experimentally measured values. Data generated from computational modeling of fire phenomena helps to identify the limitations of self-contained fire extinguishers.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Good practices for cleaning oxygen gas piping systems

Publication date: Available online 28 May 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): K.G. DeWall , L.C. Cadwallader

This article describes the cleaning method used on high-temperature oxygen piping in an experiment at the Idaho National Laboratory. The aqueous cleaning agent is commercially available. The method described here is low environmental impact and has been shown to be safe by the incident-free operation of the experiment.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Case study – Incident investigation Laboratory explosion

Publication date: Available online 2 May 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Russell Phifer

Laboratory accidents are not uncommon; evaluating the cause of an incident can help the organization take preventive measures, assess worker skills, and design appropriate training. All accidents are the result of either unsafe acts, unsafe conditions, or both. This paper analyzes a procedure which resulted in an explosion and property damage in a laboratory facility, evaluates potential causes, and provides recommendations to prevent a reoccurrence.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Contents

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3









Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Editorial Board

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3









Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Runaways and scale-ups

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Harry J. Elston







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Development of a policy to improve oversight of extremely hazardous chemicals

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Ben Owens

At the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) the use of radioactive materials and biological agents in laboratory research requires approval by the institutional radiation safety committee and biosafety committee, respectively. Investigators who want to use hazardous chemicals, however, do not have to obtain approval. This disparity in institutional oversight of different classes of hazardous materials is a result of more stringent regulatory and research funding requirements rather than the hazards posed by the materials themselves. Recognizing the potential for severe incidents involving highly reactive chemicals and other extremely hazardous chemicals, development of a policy for review of these chemicals was initiated. Development of this policy involved establishing the scope and inclusion criteria, consideration of the effect on laboratory research productivity, diplomacy, and compromise. Development of this policy in its current draft format is described.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

From beaker to bucket: The safe scale-up of organic electrolyte materials

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Trevor Dzwiniel , Krzysztof Pupek , Gregory Krumdick

Argonne's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program provide a critical junction that bridges the gap between the initial discovery and commercialization of new materials. The goal of the facility is to develop safe, scalable, and economic processes to produce kilogram quantities of material needed for industrial evaluation. This presentation will describe the main administrative and engineering measures undertaken during scale-up to assure safe transition from discovery to kilo scale syntheses of organic electrolyte materials for advanced lithium batteries.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Those pesky peroxides…

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Dawn Mason

Sensitive to different degrees of shock, heat and friction, peroxides may cause unexpected explosions and thus, are arguably one of the most hazardous classes of chemicals that are routinely handled in the laboratory. In addition, species that are known to form peroxides are often routinely handled in a number of industries by workers with varying levels of experience who may, or may not, fully understand the implications of working with such substances. This manuscript discusses examples of the risks involved in working with peroxide formers, conditions that can cause the formation of peroxides, and proper handling of peroxide formers.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

The cardinal rule of explosives safety

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): J. Keith Butler

The US Military and its contractors work safely with energetic materials on both an industrial scale and a laboratory scale. Practices and procedures used with these materials will benefit academic and research laboratories that work with reactive, energetic, and explosive materials. The most effective practice may be one of the simplest and least expensive to implement. This is especially useful for laboratories beginning new projects with inexperienced laboratory workers. Though not a substitute for a detailed chemical hazard analysis with strictly enforced standard laboratory procedures, the cardinal rule of explosives safety must be adhered to at all times: “Expose the minimum number of people to the minimum amount of explosive for the minimum amount of time” This information was originally presented at the 246th ACS National Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana September 9, 2013 for the ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety symposium “Managing reactive chemistry”.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Reactivity control using a Schlenk line

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Tilak Chandra , Jeffrey P. Zebrowski

Schlenk line (SL) techniques are very common for manipulating air and/or moisture sensitive compounds in organic, inorganic and bioorganic chemistry. Physical and chemical hazards such as pressure burst, explosions, and implosions are usually associated with the SL manipulations due to the use of inert gas, vacuum, liquid nitrogen and chemicals. Therefore researchers require skills in using the Schlenk line for chemical manipulations. This manuscript describes about the SL set-up, its use for controlling reactivity of hydrogenation and moisture sensitive chemicals, and the hazards associated with manipulations.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Acetone

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): William E. Luttrell , Austin L. LaGrow







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Things to think about when POTUS comes to campus

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): David Rainer







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Watersport

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): John DeLaHunt







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Learning from experience revisited

Publication date: May–June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 3

Author(s): Dennis C. Hendershot







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS
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