SULAIR Home

News aggregator

Nitrogen dioxide

Publication date: March–April 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 2

Author(s): William E. Luttrell







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

The Wrong Tool

Publication date: March–April 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 2

Author(s): John DeLaHunt







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

The importance of setting safety goals

Publication date: March–April 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 2

Author(s): Dennis C. Hendershot







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Hazard assessment

Publication date: March–April 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 2

Author(s): Peter C. Ashbrook







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Of trucks and trains and pipeline pains

Publication date: March–April 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 2

Author(s): Neal Langerman







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Upcoming events

Publication date: March–April 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 2









Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Stuff happens

Publication date: March–April 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 2

Author(s): Ken Fivizzani







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Guide for Authors

Publication date: March–April 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety, Volume 21, Issue 2









Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

A research university's rapid response to a fatal chemistry accident: Safety changes and outcomes

Publication date: Available online 1 February 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): James H. Gibson , Imke Schröder , Nancy L. Wayne

The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) quickly and comprehensively transformed its laboratory safety program following a chemistry accident in December 2008 that caused the death of a researcher. UCLA's Chancellor immediately announced sweeping changes in the laboratory safety program and challenged UCLA to become “Best in Class” in academic laboratory safety. Given the size of UCLA's lab researcher population and the decentralized nature of the campus, it became a daunting task to reach out and improve compliance with newly implemented safety policies. The Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) improved their operations, enhanced overall inspection procedures, and instituted mandatory laboratory safety training of PIs and researchers. A Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool (LHAT) was implemented to aid in the identification of hazards, track laboratory space and personnel, and guide lab groups in compliance with personal protective equipment (PPE) policies. Laboratory inspections were increased by more than 4-fold in 2012 as compared to 2007 and now followed a comprehensive checklist to improve reproducibility and thoroughness of the inspection process. To provide better customer service to the research community and expedite corrective actions, all laboratory inspection reports are required to be issued the next business day. Unannounced PPE inspections began in 2010, and inspection findings showed a robust decrease in non-compliance with the PPE policy within one year of its implementation. As of the first half of 2013, all PIs of active laboratory research programs had completed the initial, in-class PI-specific laboratory safety training. In 2012, more than 20,000 EH&S safety classes were completed either in-class or online by PIs, lab supervisors, research staff, students, and visitors to UCLA's research laboratories. Overall, analysis of outcomes from changes in UCLA's lab safety program indicates rapid improvements in compliance with lab safety regulations such as increased PPE use. Lab safety changes required commitment and cooperation at all levels – from executive leadership, to health and safety experts, to deans and department chairs, and to PIs and researchers.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Adding amines to steam for humidification

Publication date: Available online 23 January 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Farhad Memarzadeh

Humidity control is required in all health care facilities. Direct injection of steam from a central boiler plant is the most economical humidification system. The steam carries neutralizing amines—corrosion-inhibiting chemicals—that are added to boiler feedwater to prevent pipe corrosion. When the steam condenses, the amines neutralize the resulting carbonic acid and raise the pH of the condensate, which helps reduce, slow down, or prevent corrosion to the condensate system. This technical review compares the use of ‘clean steam’ to ‘utility’ steam and discusses the health effects, regulation, and control of three of the most commonly used amines in ‘utility’ steam: morpholine, cyclohexylamine (CHA), and diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) to make the point that proper application, control, monitoring and oversight of amines in a ‘utility’ steam system of a health care facility is safe, feasible and economical.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Evaluation of the use of an SKC button inhalable aerosol sampler with a grimm aerosol monitor to determine air concentrations of subtilisin

Publication date: Available online 10 July 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Jason Cross , Rodney R. Larson , Leon F. Pahler , Darrah K. Sleeth

Study purpose Currently, there is no OSHA or NIOSH monitoring method for subtilisin. This study evaluated a personal aerosol monitoring method for detection and quantification of subtilisin. The ACGIH ceiling limit and NIOSH short term exposure limit (STEL) for subtilisin is 0.06μg/m3 making it the lowest exposure limit established for any exposure by the organizations. This study specifically evaluated the use of an SKC Button inhalable aerosol sampler with a Grimm Aerosol Monitor for monitoring low concentrations of subtilisin particulates in air within a laundry detergent production facility. Methods Air samples of detergent with subtilisin were collected using a Button sampler containing a glass fiber filter concurrently with a Grimm model 1.109 Aerosol Spectrometer. Nineteen sampling events of four hours each were performed over a 7-week period, with three Button samplers operating simultaneously. Sampling locations included a detergent containing subtilisin (DCS) production area and a specially constructed enclosure where DCS was introduced in a controlledmanner. Sample analysis was conducted with a Konelab Arena 20 analyzer to quantify the amount of subtilisin collected on the filter of each air sample. Results A linear regression for the concentration of DCS aerosol measured in the enclosure by the Grimm was compared to the average concentration of DCS aerosol measured on the Button filter in the enclosure, which produced an R 2 value of 0.64 (p =0.006). The Pearson's correlation produced an r value of 0.8 (p =0.006). The linear regression for the average concentrations of DCS aerosol measured on the Button filter media compared to the average subtilisin detected from the aerosol in the enclosure produced an R 2 value of 0.66 (p =0.004). The Pearson's correlation produced an r value of 0.81 (p =0.004). Discussion The amount of subtilisin in all air samples in the DCS production area were below the limit of quantitation due to the subtilisin encapsulation at the DCS production area. This caused particles sizes to be greater than the inhalable fraction (100μm), which is also the limit of the size selectivity of the Button inhalable sampler. Conclusion The results of the statistical evaluation from the aerosol monitoring results in the enclosure indicate the Button inhalable sampler compared with the results from the Grimm aerosol monitor may be a valid method for determining airborne subtilisin concentrations for aerosols with diameters less than or equal to the 25μm particle size. However, due to all results below the limit of quantitation at the DCS production area, it is concluded that there are insufficient results to determine if the Button sampler with the Grimm aerosol monitor can be used in the workplace.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Case study: The value of “less than” and “non-detects” in monitoring

Publication date: Available online 24 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Harry J. Elston

Personal sampling is conducted in workplaces to establish and document the level of worker's exposure to hazardous chemicals. The results obtained from the monitoring are compared to recognized occupational exposure limits to judge if those limits have been exceeded. When the results come back from the lab as indistinguishable from a known blank or less than an occupational exposure limit some employers stop there. However, these results can often reveal important information about work practices that can be improved to reduce worker's exposure. In this case study, we look at organic vapor exposure during a “qualitative analysis” experiment at a small college and look at the results as a springboard to improve work practices and to teach workplace exposure reduction techniques.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Presenting of failure probability assessment pattern by FTA in Fuzzy logic (case study: Distillation tower unit of oil refinery process)

Publication date: Available online 23 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): M. Omidvari , S.M.R. Lavasani , S. Mirza

Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) is an appropriate tool for failure analysis and failure rate determination. In some cases, it is difficult or even impossible to determine the relationships among the main factors of system failure. Moreover manual calculation of subsystem failure probability rate is hard or impossible. Also, in some situation for the lack of information about the process and main event obtained results are uncertain. This is where fuzzy tool can be best exploited. In this study with matching of FTA and fuzzy for determination of failure probability, we can obtain accurate and certain results. Refinery industry is one of the most dangerous industries in Iran and in some places it is located near the crowded cities. The distillation unit, as one of the most dangerous units in this industry, was evaluated by Fuzzy Fault tree analysis (FFTA) tool. The findings of this study can be used in risk management method.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Incorporating safety into the general chemistry curriculum

Publication date: Available online 16 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Frankie Wood-Black

Providing safety instruction is relatively easy, but having safety become second nature to the student is very difficult. Over time laboratory safety has improved particularly in the general laboratory curriculum. However, having key elements and concepts of safety carry over into other aspects of the student's environment and building a safety culture is still in development. One approach designed to augment current safety programs has been applied to the general laboratory curriculum. This approach incorporates a safety information “scavenger hunt” and introduction of a generalized hazard analysis. Use of these tools has shown that elements of a safety culture can be instilled with a minimum of disruption in the current program.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Fire modeling of an emerging fire suppression system

Publication date: Available online 9 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Michael E. Cournoyer

Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Test methodology has been developed (experiments and computations) to predict fire induced tube wall failure in small scale compartments such as gloveboxes. A small scale test apparatus has been developed to characterize tube wall temperature and breakage properties. Computational tools have been used to better understand experiments. The heat release rate and heat flux have been accurately predicted because the forward predicted temperatures closely matched the experimentally measured values. Data generated from computational modeling of fire phenomena helps to identify the limitations of self-contained fire extinguishers.





Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

What the TSA can teach us about chemical safety

Publication date: Available online 6 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Harry J. Elston







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Reducing investigators’ administrative work load

Publication date: Available online 6 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): David Rainer







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Incident investigations

Publication date: Available online 6 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Peter C. Ashbrook







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Backwards

Publication date: Available online 5 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): John DeLaHunt







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS

Are your alarms alarming?

Publication date: Available online 5 June 2014
Source:Journal of Chemical Health and Safety

Author(s): Dennis C. Hendershot







Categories: SCI-TECH NEWS
Syndicate content