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KEEP - Keeping Emulation Environments Portable

I recently attended a workshop of the KEEP project (Keeping Emulation Environments Portable) in Rome. KEEP is an EU funded project to develop software that virtualizes old computer hardware and software environments. This allows you to run old operating systems and the applications that were designed for them on modern computers.


KEEP - Keeping Emulation Environments Portable

I recently attended a workshop of the KEEP project (Keeping Emulation Environments Portable) in Rome. KEEP is an EU funded project to develop software that virtualizes old computer hardware and software environments. This allows you to run old operating systems and the applications that were designed for them on modern computers.


Born Digital Archives - Video Presentations from 2010 Rare Books and Manuscripts Section

Video from the 2010 presentation at the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section of the American Library Association in Philidelphia. Moderators and presenters include:

Jennifer Schaffner, OCLC RLG Programs (moderator)
Laura Carroll, Emory University [slides]
Erika Farr, Emory University
Michael Olson, Stanford University [slides]
Ben Goldman, University of Wyoming [slides]

Abstract for the panel:


CBS Article on Digital Copiers

CBS has posted a very interesting article by Armen Keteyian on digital copiers and the secret documents that they may contain. See http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/04/19/eveningnews/main6412439.shtml.


First Draft of our Forensic Workflow

Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan and I have finally finished our first working draft of a forensic lab workflow using floppy diskettes from the Stephen Jay Gould collection. This first workflow or use case has been very challenging to put together. Throughout this process we’ve endeavored to make our diagram easy to understand while still capturing the operational steps and software applications that are currently being utilized by our digital archivist. We’re still in the midst of evaluating software so it is expected that some of the listed applications will be replaced.


Searching with EnCase Forensics Software

Our Digital Archivist (Peter) and I spent some time working with EnCase Forensic software and experimented with running a few search strings against a Robert Creeley computer disk. We added the words “reference” and “SSN” to the search script and were able to return ten hits across hundreds of files. All of the search hits found letters of reference Robert Creeley wrote on behalf of colleagues and students. The results were very interesting and I’m beginning to see how we might incorporate this sort of technology into the daily activities of our digital archivist.


Eric Kaltman's Stephen M. Cabrinety Collection Blog

Eric Kaltman has been working hard on cataloging and organizing Stanford's Stephen M. Cabrinety Collection. Eric has done excellent work and I highly recommend that those interested the history of computer software subscribe to his blog at http://www.stanford.edu/group/htgg/cgi-bin/drupal/?q=node/229 . Great work Eric and keep up the great work!


Advanced Forensics Day 4 – Macintosh OS and HFS +

The final day of training focused on the Macintosh disk format and operating system. Mac’s use the HFS + disk format which is significantly different from NTFS and presents some interesting challenges to forensic examiners. The design of the HFS + makes it very unlikely that a forensic investigation will recover deleted files. In the digital archival community this fact is not necessarily a bad thing but I’ll need to muse on this in a future post. I’ll end with the most useful tidbit I learned in today’s training.


Advanced Forensics Day 3 – Encryption

Today’s focus was encryption and hacking techniques. All of the tools we used today are freely available and the hardest part is figuring out when to use a particular tool. Another interesting crumb of knowledge I learned today is that the forensic community doesn’t have a solution for TrueCrypt (http://www.truecrypt.org/). This software is giving the community fits. This software allows one to create encrypted volumes that appear as other files. There are minimal clues for the forensic investigator. Techniques such as a file signature analysis won’t work.


New Digital Forensics Lab Featured in Speaking of Computers

The most recent issue of Speaking of Computers features an article on the new Digital Forensics Lab. This article is available at http://speaking.stanford.edu/highlights/New_Digital_Forensics_Lab.html.


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