Status message

The Stanford Libraries website and associated services, including SearchWorks, will be down from 10 PM Saturday, 11/28 through the morning of Sunday, 11/29 to accommodate UIT Data Center outages. More information is available.

Blog topic: Emerging tech

Mirador viewer in use

Mirador v3.0.0 is released

The Mirador development team at Stanford is happy to announce the release of Mirador v3.0.0. This release represents the first major release of the Mirador software since January 2019. Mirador 3 offers a fresh new redesigned interface and API while keeping many of the well-loved comparison features that Mirador has been known for.

Notable new features in Mirador 3 includes:

Cropped contact sheet of photos of Don Knuth.

Don Knuth email collection now available for research

Stanford Libraries’ Department of Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce that the email collection of Don Knuth has been processed. This collection consists of email from January 1999 through January 2019. Users can preview Knuth’s email corpus via Stanford's ePADD discovery website. The full text of the emails is only accessible on a workstation in the Field Reading Room, which is open to all members of the general public.

Screen shot of Google search results for images + artificial intelligence

Elements of AI in the Library

May 12, 2020
by Catherine Nicole Coleman

Last week 38 people from units across Stanford Libraries completed the six-week Elements of AI course. Of those who responded to the course survey, all said they would recommend it to colleagues. They also unanimously agreed that meeting weekly in groups to discuss each chapter was the most rewarding part of taking the course.

ePADD 1st Quarter Update

In January, the ePADD project team began work on the current phase of development to the software, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The focus for this first quarter of the year is on the redevelopment of the ePADD’s attachment review feature. Attachments are a rich source of information in an email collection, providing context to the archive owner’s work, communications, and relationships.

ANSI

ANSI releases select standards for COVID-19 support (UPDATED)

Several librarians across the United States have been petitioning ISO and ANSI to release or open up access to several critical standards in the response efforts to the COVID-19 pandemic. ANSI has announced a portal that contains several of these important standards, including standards for the fabrication of ventilators and standards for incident management response, released to the public. At this time, 31 of these ISO standards have been released, and you can access them by visiting the following links.

An artwork by James Bridle that shows a car surrounde by a solid white line an a broken white line.

Is learning about AI in libraries preparation for a future without librarians?

April 1, 2020
by Catherine Nicole Coleman

The image associated with this post is from "Autonomous Trap" by James Bridle.

If you attended or watched the talks at Fantastic Futures December 2019, you know that the answer to that question is emphatically, "No." Both of the keynote speakers addressed the essential role of libraries in providing curated data to improve AI and in preserving the data, models, and records for oversight of how the technology is implemented. Lightning talks (recordings available) demonstrated applications of AI by practitioners operating within libraries, archives, and museums. And Teemu Roos presented Elements of AI, a free online course for everyone designed to demystify AI.

Pages

RSS
accessibilityaccessprivsarrow-circle-rightaskus-chataskus-librarianbarsblogsclosecoffeecomputercomputersulcontactsconversationcopierelectricaloutleteventsexternal-linkfacebook-circlegroupstudyhoursindividualinterlibrarynewsnextoffcampusopenlateoutdoorpeoplepolicypreviousprinterprojectsquietreservesscannersearchstudysupportingtabletourstwitter-circleworking